Welcome to the #STOP! blog

What to #STOP! doing to reduce stress, enhance joy and live a life on purpose

August 25, 2016

We all deal with stressors on a daily basis. Any time we encounter something that disturbs us either mentally or physically, stress results. It’s omnipresent in life. A particularly stressful event triggers the fight-or-flight response, causing hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol to surge through your body. A little bit of stress, known as “acute stress,” can be exciting, and keeps us active and alert. The big problem comes in when you are dealing with long-term, chronic stress, which I call bad stress. Being under constant stress—either on the job or at home or both—can have dire detrimental effects on your health.

Ironically, studies have shown that healthcare workers and doctors are some of the most stressed-out people among all professions, and yet we...

August 18, 2016

We make hundreds of decisions every day. These decisions vary from the mundane to the complex such as:

  • Should I have a fruit shake for breakfast, a bowl of cereal, or just skip it because I’m late?

  • While playing chess with my son, what move should I make next as I predict his next set of moves? 

According to Nobel winner Daniel Kahneman, we make decisions by deploying two systems—thinking fast and thinking slow. System 1 is thinking fast and is automatic, based on patterns that have developed in our brain from past experience and memory. In fast thinking, we rely on rules of thumb and preconceived notions. System 1 engages first, quickly and every time. Examples of fast thinking include driving a car on an empty road.

System 2 is thinking slow and is conscious, delibera...

August 11, 2016

Physicians in the United States suffer from more burnout than other workers in the United States, new research shows.  A national survey of more than 7000 US physicians reveals that close to one half report having at least 1 symptom of burnout.

"The fact that almost 1 in 2 US physicians has symptoms of burnout implies that the origins of this problem are rooted in the environment and care delivery system rather than in the personal characteristics of a few susceptible individuals.

"Policy makers and health care organizations must address the problem of physician burnout for the sake of physicians and their patients," according to the author of the study, Tait D. Shanafelt, MD, Mayo Clinic.

I welcome your feedback.

Joy to you!

Eric Parmenter

August 4, 2016

I had the opportunity to interview Susan Cranston (www.susancranston.com) following the IFEBP Benefit Communication and Technology Institute.  Susan is a writer, speaker, former marketing executive with over two decades of experience. She is a certified master coach and a certified Health and Wellness educator specializing in Ayurveda, Yoga and Meditation.

Here is our interview

I welcome your feedback.

Joy to you!

Eric Parmenter

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#STOP! Thinking fast to do a behavior tune-up

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© 2016 by Eric Parmenter